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Turmeric + Ginger for Natural Pain Relief

Turmeric + Ginger for Natural Pain Relief

Both ginger and turmeric are rhizomes, or root stalks, used around the world, not only as food seasonings but also as traditional herbal medicines. As herbal remedies, both spices are used primarily to help alleviate different types of pain. Many scientific studies have been conducted to determine if and how each rhizome actually works. There’s reason to believe that ginger and turmeric both contain active ingredients that can provide at least some relief to those suffering from a number of painful conditions, from arthritis and gastric discomfort to migraine headaches and post-surgical pain.

Turmeric as a Pain Relief Tool

Turmeric is a commonly used spice in Southeast Asian cuisine, especially in Indian and Thai food. Curcumin, an active compound in turmeric, is known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity that can promote healing. Like ginger, studies have found that turmeric may have pain-reducing power equal in some cases to that of prescription and over-the-counter medications. In clinical studies, turmeric’s anti-inflammatory action appears to help improve rheumatoid arthritis, post-operative inflammation, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, and stomach ulcers.

Ginger as a Pain Relief Tool

The active medicinal ingredients in ginger are phytochemicals known as gingerols and shogoal. Ginger has long been used as an herbal remedy to relieve motion sickness, morning sickness, general nausea, and upset stomach and, more recently, post-surgical nausea and chemotherapy-induced nausea. Ginger has also been used to treat and prevent the growth of H pylori, the bacteria responsible for gastric infections and ulcers.

In addition to helping relieve pain, ginger may help to prevent some of the side effects associated with conventional painkillers as well. Long-term or high-dose use of aspirin and NSAIDs have been linked to stomach damage such as lesions, ulcers, and other gastrointestinal disorders. Research shows that the active compounds in ginger may help protect the lining of the stomach from damage due to these drugs, as well as alcohol and excess hydrochloric acid produced by the stomach in some conditions.

Turmeric + ginger have a long history as medicinal herbs within Ayurvedic medicine. As with many culinary herbs + spices that actually have their roots as medicinals, turmeric + ginger have a long and facinating dual history as a type of food therapy.

Records of turmeric use go back more than 4,000 years. There have even been analyses of pots dating back to 2500 BCE that found turmeric residue. Futhermore, turmeric has shown up in Ayurvedic medicinal texts as far back as 500 BCE.Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is from the same family as ginger (Ziniber offcinale). Both are tropical plants that originated from India. The roots of both plants are harvested for both culinary and medicinal purposes.

 

 

Inflammation is a major problem when it becomes chronic and inappropriately attacks your body’s own tissues. Scientists believe that chronic, low level inflammation plays a major role in pain and almost every disease. Curcumin is strongly anti-inflammatory. In fact, it’s so powerful that it matches the effectiveness of some anti-inflammatory drugs, without the side effects.

 

 

Ginger also contains very potent anti-inflammatory compounds which are called Gingerols. These substances are believed to explain why so many people with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis experience reductions in their pain levels and improvements in their mobility when they consume ginger regularly.

 

 

Both these roots contain natural compounds, which function as COX-2 inhibitors, which block the enzyme responsible for pain, swelling and inflammation.  This achieves the same function as common medications for arthritis, but without harmful side effects.

 

 

Our Turmeric Tonic is made with pure organic ingredients straight from Mother nature and combined precisely for high absorption. Daily consumption can help with pain relief, digestive health, joint pain relief + skin issues.

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Boost Your Immune System by Healing Your Gut

Did you know that nearly 70 percent of your immune system is housed in your gut? Inside the gut are about 100 trillion live microorganisms that promote normal GI function, protect the body from infection, and regulate metabolism and the mucosal immune system. In fact, they comprise more than 75% of the immune system. Getting your gut bacteria healthy is one of the most important things you can do to get and stay healthy. If your bacteria are sick, so are you!  A healthy gut microbiome is key to your overall wellness. So when you heal your gut, you”ll naturally improve your immune system!

Liquid supplements that are taken sublingually allow absorption to begin in the mouth and continue into the digestive system. On top of that, our Turmeric Tonic is made with fresh organic lemon juice which has close to the same Ph level as stomach acid, making it able to be absorbed faster. 

Because of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, turmeric can contribute to healthy digestion. It’s used in ayurvedic medicine as a digestive healing agent.

According to research published in the journal PLOS ONE (Public Library of Science), curcumin, a compound found in turmeric is known to have anti-inflammatory properties that help boost immunity. Turmeric, which is antiviral, anti-fungal and anti-bacterial, is also prebiotic that promotes the growth of healthy bacteria in our gut.

“Turmeric is a powerful herb with over 300 nutrients including beta-carotene, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), calcium, flavonoids, fibre, iron, niacin, potassium, zinc among others. But the active compound which has caught the attention of scientists, supplement industries and food technologists is curcumin for its anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties. Absorption of curcumin from turmeric is enhanced by 2000 times by peppering, a compound present in black pepper. Somehow our ancestors seem to have cracked this knowledge as all our recipes have both turmeric and black pepper in combination,”  says Nikhil Chaudhary, nutritionist.

Dhivya, Senior Dietician, Fortis Hospital, Bannerghatta Road, Bangalore says, “Turmeric in its raw form is packed with several health benefits including immune-modulatory effects. Studies conducted on curcumin and other bioactive components in turmeric reported having beneficial effects in various disease conditions, by modulating the immune system. Raw turmeric is one of the main ingredients in several home remedies used for various health issues. It is considered as a magic elixir to ward off the common cold and seasonal flu. Especially in children, it is associated with a reduction in Recurrent Respiratory Tract Infections. Raw turmeric concoctions/ tea taken daily over a while may help to improve immunity”.

Here are some of the benefits of having raw turmeric

* It helps facilitate smoother digestion through the tracts.

* Consumption of raw turmeric may also help treat stomach ulcers and irritation.

* It also helps in reducing inflammation in the body.

* All of these factors also lead to a reduction of skin impurities. Traditionally, it is also used in treating skin ailments.

* It purifies the blood, eliminating toxins from it.

* Raw turmeric has been known to regulate blood sugar levels too.

* Inflammation is an important part of the immune system to fight infections and is a short term process. When the inflammation becomes chronic it leads to various health problems including cancers. Turmeric has shown anti-inflammatory properties that could prevent chronic inflammation and therefore such diseases. https://indianexpress.com/article/lifestyle/health/raw-turmeric-boost-immunity-benefits-6340737/

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Turmeric & Black Pepper

Turmeric Black Pepper

Turmeric & Black Pepper

How Black Pepper Works With Turmeric

Just like approximately 5% of the spice turmeric is composed of an active compound called curcumin, about 5% of black pepper by weight is comprised of this compound called piperine. Curcumin is responsible for the yellow color of turmeric and piperine for the pungent flavor of pepper. Piperine is a potent inhibitor of drug metabolism. One of the ways our liver gets rid of foreign substances is making them water soluble so they can be more easily excreted. But this black pepper molecule inhibits that process which is what we want so that the Curcumin can be absorbed.

And it doesn’t take much. If people are given a bunch of Curcumin, within an hour there’s a little bump in the level in their blood stream. We don’t see a large increase because our liver is actively trying to get rid of it. But what if the process is suppressed by taking just a quarter teaspoon’s worth of black pepper? Then you see curcumin levels skyrocket. The same amount of curcumin consumed, but the bioavailability shoots up 2000%. Even just a little pinch of pepper—1/20th of a teaspoon—can significantly boost levels. And guess what a common ingredient in curry powder is besides turmeric? Black pepper. https://www.umassmed.edu/nutrition/blog/blog-posts/2019/6/using-black-pepper-to-enhance-the-anti-inflammatory-effects-of-turmeric/https://nutritionfacts.org/2015/02/05/why-pepper-boosts-turmeric-blood-leve

Our Turmeric Tonic is made from locally sourced, organic ingredients with the incredible bioavailability of black pepper. Made in small batches with Aloha, we work directly with famers + always make the best Turmeric Tonic out there. Start your long term health regimen today and experience why so many people are talking about how our Turmeric Tonic has helped them!

Not all Inflammation is the Same

It’s a scourge of modern life, each year gobbling up billions of health care dollars in the United States alone.

When it’s good, it fights off foreign invaders, heals injuries and mops up debris. But when it’s bad, inflammation ignites a long list of disorders: arthritis, asthma, atherosclerosis, blindness, cancer, diabetes and, quite possibly, autism and mental illness.

Fortunately, help is on the way. Vanderbilt University researchers such as Jacek Hawiger, M.D., Ph.D., who has studied the evolving paradigms of inflammation for three decades, are on the front lines of a worldwide scientific campaign to reveal inflammation’s secrets.

Like the Allies during World War II, “we want to intercept the code and change it to our benefit,” says Kasey Vickers, Ph.D., a Vanderbilt pioneer in the fledgling field of microRNA.

Inflammation’s arsenal is packed with powerful weapons.

“Inflammation is the body’s response to microbial, autoimmune, metabolic or physical insults,” including burns and physical trauma, said Hawiger, Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Louise B. McGavock Professor.

White blood cells, including granulocytes and macrophages, are the “first responders” to sites of infection and injury. They emit waves of chemicals that can kill germs outright, and protein messengers called cytokines to carry out a bewilderingly wide array of duties.

When these weapons misfire, however, they can wreak havoc. They can even kill.

TWIN PEAKS

Obesity and its constant companion, type 2 diabetes, are at epidemic proportions in this country. One thing that connects them is inflammation.

Normally, the first responders to the site of injury or infection are white blood cells—including macrophages. They produce waves of chemicals, including cytokines, which can kill germs and sound the alarm for other populations of inflammatory cells.

But fat cells can produce cytokines, too. And as fat tissue grows, it attracts inflammatory cells, particularly macrophages. The burden of obesity also crushes fat cells to death. And that makes the problem worse, as inflammatory cells move in to clean up the debris.

Inflammation also antagonizes the action of insulin, the hormone that stimulates muscle and liver to absorb glucose from the blood. And obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, in turn, increase the risk for heart disease.

During the past three years, Vanderbilt researchers Lan Wu, M.D., and Luc Van Kaer, Ph.D., Elizabeth and John Shapiro Professor, have identified two subpopulations of white blood cells that play key roles in obesity-associated inflammation.

“There is still a long way to go,” cautioned Wu, research associate professor of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology. “You cannot design effective therapies without knowing what comes in, what goes out and ‘what’s cooking’ in the middle.” https://medschool.vanderbilt.edu/vanderbilt-medicine/the-good-the-bad-and-the-ugly-of-inflammation/

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The Good, The Bad and the Ugly of Inflammation

Inflammation

The Good, The Bad and the Ugly of Inflammation

Not all Inflammation is the Same

It’s a scourge of modern life, each year gobbling up billions of health care dollars in the United States alone.

When it’s good, it fights off foreign invaders, heals injuries and mops up debris. But when it’s bad, inflammation ignites a long list of disorders: arthritis, asthma, atherosclerosis, blindness, cancer, diabetes and, quite possibly, autism and mental illness.

Fortunately, help is on the way. Vanderbilt University researchers such as Jacek Hawiger, M.D., Ph.D., who has studied the evolving paradigms of inflammation for three decades, are on the front lines of a worldwide scientific campaign to reveal inflammation’s secrets.

Like the Allies during World War II, “we want to intercept the code and change it to our benefit,” says Kasey Vickers, Ph.D., a Vanderbilt pioneer in the fledgling field of microRNA.

Inflammation’s arsenal is packed with powerful weapons.

“Inflammation is the body’s response to microbial, autoimmune, metabolic or physical insults,” including burns and physical trauma, said Hawiger, Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Louise B. McGavock Professor.

White blood cells, including granulocytes and macrophages, are the “first responders” to sites of infection and injury. They emit waves of chemicals that can kill germs outright, and protein messengers called cytokines to carry out a bewilderingly wide array of duties.

When these weapons misfire, however, they can wreak havoc. They can even kill.

TWIN PEAKS

Obesity and its constant companion, type 2 diabetes, are at epidemic proportions in this country. One thing that connects them is inflammation.

Normally, the first responders to the site of injury or infection are white blood cells—including macrophages. They produce waves of chemicals, including cytokines, which can kill germs and sound the alarm for other populations of inflammatory cells.

But fat cells can produce cytokines, too. And as fat tissue grows, it attracts inflammatory cells, particularly macrophages. The burden of obesity also crushes fat cells to death. And that makes the problem worse, as inflammatory cells move in to clean up the debris.

Inflammation also antagonizes the action of insulin, the hormone that stimulates muscle and liver to absorb glucose from the blood. And obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, in turn, increase the risk for heart disease.

During the past three years, Vanderbilt researchers Lan Wu, M.D., and Luc Van Kaer, Ph.D., Elizabeth and John Shapiro Professor, have identified two subpopulations of white blood cells that play key roles in obesity-associated inflammation.

“There is still a long way to go,” cautioned Wu, research associate professor of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology. “You cannot design effective therapies without knowing what comes in, what goes out and ‘what’s cooking’ in the middle.” https://medschool.vanderbilt.edu/vanderbilt-medicine/the-good-the-bad-and-the-ugly-of-inflammation/